Unlock the Secrets to Growing Thryallis

Team McFly Sep 15, 2023
40 People Read
thryallis plant
Table of Contents
  1. How to Grow Thryallis
    1. Watering
    2. Fertilizing
    3. Pruning
    4. Transplanting

How to Grow Thryallis

Thryallis, also known as rain-of-gold or Galphimia glauca, is an easy-to-care shrub that adds year-round color to your landscape. It thrives best in full sun but will tolerate some shade if necessary.

This evergreen, clump-forming shrub is ideal for hedging or ornamental purposes. Its yellow flowers and charming cottage garden aesthetic make it an excellent addition to South Florida gardens.

Watering

Thryallis is an easy-to-care-for plant that thrives in containers. All you need to do is provide it with some general potting soil, which can be found at most home and garden stores.

Maintain a balanced moisture level in the soil to prevent root rot. To prevent this, water your Thryallis plant only when the soil feels dry. Additionally, fertilize it three times a year with an excellent granular fertilizer.

You can prune your Thryallis plants to achieve a more even shape. Use hand loppers after the first frost and trim back any dead, old, or overcrowded stems up until the base of the branch collar.

Planting in soil


Fertilizing

Thryallis plants don't typically need fertilizers, but you can give them a little boost in the spring or summer to increase bloom production. You can fertilize with either general-purpose water-soluble feed or slow-release fertilizer.

Once established,thryallis is drought-tolerant and generally free from pests or diseases, making it an ideal choice for low-maintenance landscapes. Florida's Central and South Zones 9-11 are ideal growing zones for this shrub, though it may need additional water during dry spells of the season. It makes an attractive perennial border or can be combined with other flowering plants to create an eye-catching mass of color and texture.

Thryallis is an easy-to-grow shrub that can be propagated from seeds planted in spring or tender softwood cuttings taken during the summer. Once established, thryallis is pest-free except for occasional attacks by spider mites.

Pruning

If your Thryallis plants aren't quite what you expected, pruning may be necessary to achieve the desired shape. This could involve trimming back dead or diseased branches or for more severe applications like topiary arrangements.

Shape a shrub by pruning at least once annually during winter or autumn when new growth is visible. This technique, known as hard pruning, helps promote good plant health and encourages strong new growth.

This evergreen tropical shrub is native to the tropics, growing up to 9 feet tall and wide in warm areas where it serves as an ornamental hedge between zones 9B-11. The foliage is vibrant green with red stems of new shoots at the ends, blooming with clusters of yellow flowers in summer and fall.

thryallis plant

Transplanting

Thryallis, commonly known as Rain-of-Gold, is an attractive shrub that can serve many purposes - screening plants for privacy, ground cover, or background plants for smaller focal plants. Its clusters of yellow stars appear from late summer through autumn.

Florida landscapers often opt for this low-maintenance plant due to its drought tolerance and pest resistance. Furthermore, it thrives in sandy or loamy soils.

Propagating Thryallis plants is easy! Sow seeds or take tender softwood cuttings during the summer and dip the ends in rooting hormone powder. Your seedlings should sprout within six months after planting.

When transplanting Thryallis plants, it's best to do so when they are young - about one foot tall and six feet wide. Then, dig deeper and wider so the roots have plenty of room to spread out.

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Table of Contents
  1. How to Grow Thryallis
    1. Watering
    2. Fertilizing
    3. Pruning
    4. Transplanting