Creating Your Dream Lawn: A Guide to Selecting Sod

Team McFly Sep 23, 2023
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lawn sod
Table of Contents
  1. How to Choose the Right Sod for Your New Yard
    1. Introduction
    2. You Need a Soil Test:
    3. Fescue Grass:
    4. Bermuda Grass:
    5. Zoysia Grass:
    6. Ryegrass:
    7. Centipede Sod:
    8. St. Augustine Grass:
    9. Kentucky Bluegrass Sod:
    10. Recent Featured Posts:

How to Choose the Right Sod for Your New Yard

Introduction

In order to properly landscape your new house, you must select the appropriate sod for your particular yard. The kind of sod you select will affect the condition of your lawn and how quickly it will develop.

When building a new home, it is important to consider the type of sod you want for your lawn. Your choice of sod will have an impact on how your yard looks and feels overall, as well as how much maintenance it needs.

Here are some of the best sod options for brand-new homes:

You Need a Soil Test:

Obtaining a soil test is the first step. Knowing your soil's pH will enable you to choose the right type of fertilizer to add before installing your sod.

Fescue Grass:

When constructing a rich, established lawn, homeowners should consider using fescue sod. It's a low-maintenance, resilient turfgrass that does well in a variety of environments and is particularly beneficial for homeowners who live in rocky or dry places.

For the majority of the country, planting is best done in the fall since it gives the seed time to germinate before the ground freezes and the grass stays dormant for the winter. This allows the seed ample time to establish a solid root system and grow into a robust grass that can withstand the effects of heat and drought.

This particular turfgrass variety is one of the few harbors endophytes, fungi that coexist harmoniously with the plant and improve its ability to resist heat and drought. Fescues that have been endophyte-enhanced are also very resistant to harm from insects and mammals.

Most turf-type tall fescue makes for a tough, weed-free, stunning lawn. A typical-sized lawn only has to be mowed once or twice a week, and it only needs to be watered occasionally during periods of heavy rain.

Maintain the height of your fescue grass by cutting it to around 3 inches each week and removing no more than half of the blade length in any one mowing session for a thicker, more flourishing lawn. This increases your lawn's resistance to drought stress by decreasing weed competition, shading the soil, and encouraging deeper roots.

Turf-type tall fescue grass varieties need less fertilizer than older, more invasive forms because their deep root growth enhances their capacity to absorb both the nutrients found in the soil naturally and those you supply through fertilizers.

Your grass will benefit from a healthier, more appealing yard, and you'll gain greater value from your fertilizer inputs.

This turfgrass also has the benefit of being easier to mow than other species of grass. It is a fantastic option for homeowners who wish to grow their own grass to reduce the cost of maintaining their lawn because it is far more resilient and simple to grow than ryegrass and bluegrass.

Kentucky Bluegrass Sod:

Due to its dark green hue, fine texture, and capacity to rebound from challenges, Kentucky bluegrass is a well-liked lawn grass in the United States. It thrives in a range of mild to cool temperatures with enough rainfall. The Poa pratensis species spreads by rhizomes and creates a dense sod. The northern parts of the nation are populated by perennial, cool-season grass.

It is employed as an erosion control plant and is a great choice for permanent grazing pastures. To improve its capacity to bounce back from stress, it is frequently combined with other grasses.

When temperatures are moderate and rain is more frequent, late summer or early fall is the optimum time to sow cool-season grass. Ten to fourteen pounds per acre should be used for seeding.

For Kentucky bluegrass to thrive, the soil must be healthy, well-drained, and high in nutrients like calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, and nitrogen. Ideal pH ranges between 6 and 7.

When Kentucky bluegrass is correctly planted, it will spread through rhizomes that create nodes beneath the soil's surface. These nodes will manufacture carbohydrates during the growing season from reserves kept in the roots and above-ground shoots. Then, starting in the spring, new shoot growth has access to this resource.

In the spring and summer, Kentucky bluegrass leaf blades are typically 3 to 4 inches long; in the late summer and fall, they go shorter. Boat-shaped tips and light-colored midrib lines are characteristics of leaves.

Kentucky bluegrass is susceptible to disease, just like all warm-season turfgrasses. Rusts in the fall and leaf stains in the late winter are typical issues. While leaf spot makes the lawn dormant, rusts cause weakening and expose the stand to invading intruders that can germinate.

Fortunately, Kentucky bluegrass now has much higher quality thanks to breeding and selection initiatives. Improved color, low growth, disease resistance, heat tolerance, shade tolerance, and improved seed output have all been the focus of these efforts.

Although some of these characteristics have improved, Kentucky bluegrass is still vulnerable to the fungus-caused West of the Cascades Disease, and many new cultivars are not resistant to the turf-damaging Stripe Smut, Necrotic Ring Spot, or Fusarium patch.

sod

Bermuda Grass:

This type of grass is common in the American South and does well in dry, hot environments.

It is an attractive plant because of its fine texture, vibrant green color, and high heat and drought resistance. Bermuda grass is another low-care option because it doesn't require frequent mowing or fertilizer.

Zoysia Grass:

Is well known for its fine texture and velvety feel. Additionally, it requires less water than other grass types and is remarkably drought-resistant. Zoysia grass doesn't require regular mowing because of its slow growth. It is also exceptionally resistive to disease and heavy foot activity.

Ryegrass:

Ryegrass may be your best option if you want grass that grows uickly, can withstand dryness and inhibits the growth of weeds. This sod is not only a great option in terms of appearance, but it can also withstand drought and thrive in some shadows.

There are annual and perennial forms of ryegrass. Despite being suitable for a range of lawn care tasks, each variety has benefits and cons.

Due to its cool-season growth profile, perennial ryegrass is at its best in the fall and spring when it is sown. This suggests that it can endure warmer, drier northern winters and the drier, southern climates.

It can prevent erosion, improve color, eradicate weeds, and cover warm-season, cold-hardy grasses throughout the winter. Perennial ryegrass is also very beneficial to livestock like sheep and cattle in terms of nutrition.

Perennial ryegrass is a staple of the commercial lawn care industry and is usually used in conjunction with fescues, Kentucky bluegrass, and other grasses. It can be blended with different kinds of sod to make a more interesting environment.

A blend of premium perennial ryegrass cultivars called Pennington's Smart Seed Perennial Ryegrass Grass Seed and Fertilizer Mix utilizes less water to create and maintain a thick, green, drought-resistant lawn that can handle high foot traffic. Through the use of seed coat technology, it is fertilized. After taking root, these hybrids can save up to 30% more water each year than regular grass seeds.

When fully established, ryegrass lawns require about an inch of water, with the south needing about an inch per week and the north needing about an inch every 10 to 14 days. Ryegrass can require more watering than usual during the hottest and most humid parts of the summer since it is prone to heat stress.

To improve the amount of oxygen and water that reaches the root zone, you should core aerate the soil before establishing a ryegrass lawn. Afterward, you should apply a top-notch starting fertilizer and maintain the soil's constant moisture until the ryegrass seedlings emerge.

sod

Centipede Sod:

Popular in the Southeast of the United States, centipede grass is known for needing little maintenance. Because of its slow growth and resistance to pests and diseases, less mowing is required. Because of its delicate texture and vivid green hue, centipede grass is a popular choice for new homes.

A grass grown from seed, plugs, or sod is referred to as a centipede. It is well-liked by people who want a lawn that requires little to no upkeep and little to no fertilizing.

Its resistance to grubs makes it the ideal choice for people who lead busy lives and want to maintain the beauty of their yard all year long. However, it requires more watering during the summer because it is not as drought-tolerant as certain other forms of sod.

Aerating the soil and preparing it are the initial steps in growing centipede grass. This will guarantee speedy and equal growth of the new grass. More air and water will be able to enter the compacted soil thanks to aeration.

It's time to sow the grass seed after the soil has been prepared. Either by hand or with a lawn spreader, this is possible. To prevent any potential clumps from forming from the seed, it is crucial to prepare the area adequately and distribute the seeds equally.

Centipede grass spreads via roots as well as stolons, and above-ground stems that produce new grass blades on top. If neglected, these runners can become a nuisance, but they are simple to reduce and manage.

If you want to grow centipede grass from a plug, you'll need to break up the soil and pull out any prior grasses that could have been there. If your property has a lot of weeds or grass, this process may be challenging and time-consuming. Unwanted grass can be chopped out quickly with a sod cutter.

Whatever way you decide, it is a good idea to overseed your new grass in the early spring and the late fall to give your yard more substance. Your lawn will live longer and be stronger for the winter as a result of this.

Traditional centipede seed and perennial ryegrass are two types of grass that can be used to overseed centipede grass. It is preferable to ask a local garden center what kind of seed they would suggest.

St. Augustine Grass:

This type of grass is ideal for homes in the coastal South due to its high tolerance for humidity and salt.

Dark green in color, it has a dense, carpet-like appearance. St. Augustine grass needs to be nourished and mowed frequently even though it is a hardy choice that can withstand heavy foot traffic.

Kentucky Bluegrass Sod:

In the northern United States, Kentucky bluegrass is a typical grass known for its rich, lush appearance.

It has a delicate texture, and a brilliant green hue, and can tolerate frigid conditions quite well. Kentucky bluegrass is a hardy choice that can withstand high foot traffic and is appropriate for households with children or pets.

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Table of Contents
  1. How to Choose the Right Sod for Your New Yard
    1. Introduction
    2. You Need a Soil Test:
    3. Fescue Grass:
    4. Bermuda Grass:
    5. Zoysia Grass:
    6. Ryegrass:
    7. Centipede Sod:
    8. St. Augustine Grass:
    9. Kentucky Bluegrass Sod:
    10. Recent Featured Posts: