Best Deer-Resistant Plants for The Northeast

Team McFly Sep 08, 2023
6 People Read
deer eating plants
Table of Contents
  1. Top Deer-Resistant Plants
    1. Bee Balm plant
    2. Russian Sage plant
    3. Lavender plant
    4. Yarrow plant
    5. Ornamental grasses
    6. Ferns
    7. Herbs

Top Deer-Resistant Plants

If deer are common in your area, deer-resistant plants will help protect your favorite flowers, perennials, and shrubs from Bambi's hunger pangs.

Lenten Rose (Leucaena leucantha), is an evergreen deer-resistant shrub that produces fragrant pink blossoms during winter and spring (around Lent), as well as toxic berries which deer tend to avoid.

Bee Balm plant

Bee Balm plant

Bee Balm plant (Monarda didyma) is a mint species that are easy to cultivate, thriving in full sun environments, and ideal for perennial borders, native gardens, butterfly gardens, or along woodland edges. These tubular flowers attract bees and butterflies as pollinators and hummingbirds who visit to feed on their nectar.

Monarda is an acclaimed medicinal herb for treating colds, flu, lung issues, and other minor conditions. Additionally, it may be applied topically to relieve itching and swelling caused by bee stings.

This plant is resilient against many common pests, such as deer and slugs; however, when wet, its leaves may be damaged by fungal diseases such as mildew and rust that have the potential to form fungal growths such as mildew.

Bee Balm should be planted in well-drained, nutrient-rich soil with an ideal pH of 6.0-6.9. Water your plants only as needed, and add mulch for extra moisture retention.

Bee Balm plants have fast growth rates, so you should plant them 18-24 inches apart in beds and borders for optimal rebloom opportunities. This will allow them to spread out as they need, giving you more chances to rebloom your flowers each season.

Russian Sage plant

Russian Sage plant

Russian Sage plants are beautiful perennials that provide beautiful fragrance, heat, and drought tolerance, are great additions to landscapes, and attract hummingbirds and butterflies alike, with blooms lasting well into fall.

Silver Stem and Foil Daisy contribute a delicate airiness to any landscape. Use this filler in mixed borders or containers alongside bold-foliaged plants such as canna lily, coral bells, or lady's mantle for an airy atmosphere.

Sage can also remedy digestive disorders like nausea and diarrhea by steeping its fresh or dried leaves in 8 ounces of hot water for 15-30 minutes until desired effects appear.

Russian Sage is a beloved flower known for its beautiful foliage and blooms and its medicinal uses; it is commonly used to treat fevers, headaches, and stomachaches. Furthermore, it can also serve as a repellent against cabbage worms and other garden insects.

Migrating hummingbirds use butterfly bush to find nectar for their migration journey in late summer and early fall, and butterfly bush is a beloved garden plant as it tolerates heat, drought, and poor soil. Ideal conditions for planting include sunny locations, but it will thrive even with partial shade coverage.

Lavender plant

Lavender plant

Lavender is an easy and stunning shrub to cultivate, providing beauty and antiseptic benefits in your home. Use its sweet aroma in laundry soap and other cleaning products, or infuse the milk with dried lavender for an aromatic hot chocolate drink!

There are various varieties of lavenders, but English (Lavandula angustifolia) is known for being hardy to Zone 5 and offering fragrant purple, blue, and white blooms. While this variety can grow well in any soil type, its preferred environment should have a neutral to alkaline pH that drains well for maximum effectiveness.

Grow it in containers as long as they provide good drainage. A soil mix combining sand, topsoil, and compost works best, but gravel or broken pottery shards may also work to increase air circulation and drainage.

For optimal results, plant lavender in a sunny spot with good drainage and enough room for its roots to spread freely. Water it occasionally without overdoing it - too much can cause root rot! - to ensure maximum success.

Yarrow plant

Yarrow plant

Achillea millefolium (yarrow), commonly referred to by its common name of "yarrow," is an adaptable perennial that thrives from zones 3-9 with minimal care requirements and adaptation for various soil types.

Wild fields across North America often boast this plant, though gardens also benefit from planting it as an open meadow, border, or groundcover.

This herb has long been utilized for its medicinal uses. It is a great herbal supplement to combat or avoid various ailments and diseases and an effective wound treatment and home apothecary addition.

As with many herbs, yarrow is a natural pain reliever and anti-inflammatory agent that facilitates digestion and improves bowel function.

If you want to grow yarrow, start your seedlings indoors about eight weeks before the last frost date and plant them outdoors after all danger of frost has passed. Or purchase plants at your local garden center.

Ornamental grasses

Ornamental grasses are among the most popular and versatile garden plants. These versatile beauties can serve many functions, from groundcovers and privacy screens to complete perennial/shrub borders.

Ornamental grasses provide year-round appeal and variety with their varied heights, textures, foliage colors, and leaf shapes. Furthermore, ornamental grasses add movement and sound to your garden space.

Ornamental grasses are a great choice for smaller gardens as they're both deer-resistant and low maintenance, perfect for smaller spaces like containers.

Some grasses feature eye-catching plumes that draw visitors into your garden. These feathery beauties look incredible during spring and summer and make for an eye-catching backdrop against which blooming flowers or vegetables can stand out beautifully.

Grass can provide excellent ground coverage in dry or shaded areas. From mounds and fountains to tall verticals - grass forms vary greatly and create texture and interest in any room or landscape.

Numerous ornamental kinds of grass exhibit vibrant fall hues ranging from green to golden yellow, red, or purple before transitioning to tan or straw hues during winter. If desired, these colorful grasses should be cut back as soon as spring arrives - although for maximum decorative value and new growth potential, wait until mid-March as new growth starts again.

Ferns

Ferns

Ferns are an innovative species of vascular plant reproducing through spores rather than seeds or flowers, making them highly resistant to deer damage. Their spores travel far and can even be dispersed by birds and animals - giving rise to a form of propagation called "carpeting."

Watermelons make an eye-catching centerpiece for any garden when combined with other plants, as their unique clump-forming grasslike appearance adds depth. Their variegated foliage brings life and depth to any setting.

Though their looks may seem uncommon, these flowers are easy to grow and highly adaptable - they tolerate all soil conditions, from heavy clay and sandy loam to sandy sands.

Some ferns are specifically adapted to growing in humid areas, making them great options if you live in a tropical climate with frequent rainfall. You can easily raise them from collected spores for easy cultivation with low maintenance requirements.

Ferns are another excellent choice for gardeners with limited space, as their slow growth makes training them to a specific shape or height easy. Ferns make stunning additions to any garden, providing ground cover while being very attractive to bees, butterflies, and other wildlife.

Herbs

Do You Want To Bring More Fragrance and Texture to Your Garden Without Worrying About Deer?

deer eating plants

For an aromatic perennial herb solution that won't attract deer, aromatic perennial herbs could be perfect. With scents that deer don't like, such as mint, thyme, French tarragon, lavender, and chives, aromatic perennial herbs make great additions.

Herbs can also help attract butterflies and bees to your garden, such as bee balm (which attracts bees), while dill and parsley can attract pollinators.

Lavender and thyme are other useful herbs known for their antiseptic properties and ability to help children avoid infections.

They can also serve as natural repellents against mosquitoes and other insects, while being added to tea can strengthen immunity and decrease inflammation.

Herbs make an excellent addition to any garden, adding flavor, color, texture, and health benefits to food. Grow some in pots on your windowsill or directly in the ground to take full advantage of all their benefits.

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Table of Contents
  1. Top Deer-Resistant Plants
    1. Bee Balm plant
    2. Russian Sage plant
    3. Lavender plant
    4. Yarrow plant
    5. Ornamental grasses
    6. Ferns
    7. Herbs